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([personal profile] xoxomarina posting in [community profile] actyourwage Sep. 19th, 2017 08:47 pm)
Anyone who thinks they were affected by the Equifax security breach (or even if you weren't), feel free to check out the post I created with tons of resources for pulling and freezing your credit: https://xoxomarina.dreamwidth.org/239500.html

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We may not get more Jude | Zero | Zude in canon, but that doesn’t mean we can’t get them in our fic/art/vids! This round of Team Zude Comment!Fic & Art Fest is for virtual season four-related prompts where Jude and Zero are both still on the show.

Leave a prompt in comments to this post at [community profile] team_zude. If you find a prompt that you like, go ahead and fill it!

The Fest will run for ~6 weeks, beginning today, Friday, September 15th, and running through midnight Tuesday, October 31st. See the post linked above for more information.
Moon Woke Me Up Nine Times: Selected Haiku of Basho, by Bashō Matsuo, translated by David Young: A delightful collection. David Young's introduction is informative and easy to read, which is a rarity in poetry collections and must be praised, though you won't learn a thing about Bashō from it. Young says you can get that everywhere else; instead, the introduction addresses Young's approach to translating these poems, and I was quite surprised at the amount of latitude Young gave himself. Due to the differences between the number of syllables in English and Japanese, he disregards the West's belief that haiku must conform to a 5-7-5 arrangement, which is fine by me, but he also elides cultural references he thought would be lost on English-speaking audiences, reorders the lines themselves, and even removes the occasional question mark, and I don't know how I feel about that. The result is lovely, but is it an honest reflection of Bashō's words?

In Young's hands, Bashō's poetry is clear and simple, each haiku a meditation on life and nature. They are, by turns, longing, playful, soothing, and contemplative, and it's remarkable how many sensory details they include. So much is packed into these little sentences, giving you brief glimpses of another life, transporting you to where Bashō was three hundred years ago, listening to the rain, gardening, or:
Big white leeks
washing them off
feeling how cold
The poetry is transcendent, in that it moved me to a different place. Once I came back, though, I wondered a lot about the choices Young made. I really would have liked some translator's notes (outside of those in the introduction), but instead I'll have to content myself with reading Jane Reichhold's Basho: The Complete Haiku and go over her notes to see how their translations differ. This is actually Young's idea, and he helpfully includes an appendix that correlates his page numbers with Reichhold's numbering system for easy comparison.

Really accessible, and highly recommended.
bedlamsbard: animals: a cougar standing on a tall rock (girlyb_icons) (a high place (girlyb_icons))
([personal profile] bedlamsbard Sep. 13th, 2017 02:13 pm)
We came through Tropical Storm Irma all right -- Housemate R and I are both fine, the house is fine, the property is fine. While we're right by a creek, it didn't overflow its banks despite rising pretty precipitously, which is the thing I was really worried about. (The house itself is up quite a ways from a creek, but if it had flooded there's a good chance it would have gotten the basement and maybe the carport; R moved her car to higher ground before the storm really got going.)

We did end up losing power on Monday afternoon, and as of now (Wednesday afternoon) it still hasn't been restored. Here's hoping that it's up by the time I get back from campus today -- Emory cancelled Monday and Tuesday, but is open today. At least...at least I have a good explanation for why I don't have my readings for class done? Since they're all on my laptop. This is why we don't have power. GDOT took the tree down yesterday afternoon/evening; Housemate R went up to check the situation out this morning (it's just up the street from us, about a five minute walk) and said that Georgia Power is working on it, and since there's an elementary school, a senior center, and a major intersection right there we're hopeful that it will be resolved today. (The City of Decatur said that getting power back to the elementary schools is one of their priorities for the day, so here's hoping -- apparently all the schools in the city except the high school had no power as of last night.)

This is the third time a tropical depression, tropical storm, or hurricane has blown through within the first couple weeks of school for me -- Gustav when I was a freshman, a tropical depression when I was a senior (I think that was only a depression, not a storm), and now Irma in grad school. Apparently Atlanta's first ever tropical storm, just my luck. Leave New Orleans, get a hurricane anyway...

We still have water and gas, which means we even have hot water and I was able to take a shower by candlelight last night. So things could be worse, but I would really like power back.
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([personal profile] jo posting in [site community profile] dw_community_promo Sep. 13th, 2017 08:59 am)
Now that season 3 is underway, come join us at [community profile] outlander_forum , a discussion community for fans of the Starz TV adaptation and/or Diana Gabaldon's books. We've already got a discussion of episode 301 underway, so come and join in!!



bedlamsbard: animals: a cougar standing on a tall rock (girlyb_icons) (a high place (girlyb_icons))
([personal profile] bedlamsbard Sep. 9th, 2017 09:51 pm)
Huh, so I haven't posted in like...a while.

1. I am in Georgia! I moved last month. So far Atlanta is mostly driving me crazy with its lack of a grid system, whose bright idea was that? Emory's campus is the same way, and both are really frustrating to me because while I have a very spatial memory, I didn't realize until now how dependent I am on being able to orient myself, which I just...can't do here. It's basically impossible for me to orient myself anywhere in Atlanta or on campus, or in Decatur, which is where I'm living now. So I get lost very easily. I'm pretty sure Emory is built on a fold in the space/time continuum or into a fairy hill or something, it would explain a few things.

2. School is fine; we're on week 3 (more or less; due to Labor Day I've only had my Monday class once) and unfortunately I have two 4:30-7:30 seminars and one 1:00-4:00 seminar, and those late afternoon classes are killing me. In some ways it's preferable to having morning classes; on the other hand, they wipe me out for the rest of the evening. Three seminars is also a lot; I've had seminars before but always mixed in with lectures, never just seminars. Well, Leicester was seminars, but they were two hours and there were only two of them a semester, not three.

3. The housemate situation is good, if occasionally disorienting because living with new people is always An Experience. But so far she's very sweet and I like her a lot.

4. I went to Dragon Con last Saturday, just for the day, which was an interesting experience -- my first non-Star Wars Celebration con. I was in the vendors' hall the whole time, since I thought about it and I thought about it and eventually decided against going to any of the Star Wars panels. (I thought about going up Friday too since that was when most of the SW stuff was, and decided not to.) But it was fun, and -- and it was such a relief being in a fannish space and knowing I wasn't going to turn a corner and see my ex, since she's in England. Just an enormous relief. Also I bought a lot of things, since, see again, spent the entire day in the vendors' hall. (Also I discovered the Peachtree street problem in downtown Atlanta is real; who put Peachtree Street and Peachtree Center Avenue NEXT TO EACH OTHER?)

5. I am in High Panic Mode because Atlanta's in Irma's path, though presumably by the time it gets here it will have downgraded to a tropical storm or depression. But I don't like not knowing how to react; Atlanta is a bit less blase about hurricanes than New Orleans, and not being in university housing for the first time in my student life means that I don't have the reassurance of knowing that the university is looking out for me, either. The discrepancy between the news going DEATH DOOM DESPAIR (and people buying up water in the grocery stores) and Emory going "yeah, whatever, we're keeping an eye on it but you still have class on Monday" is really throwing me. I HAVE TO DO HOMEWORK? I'VE SCHEDULED THIS TIME FOR PANIC! And then I feel guilty about it because it's not like I'm in Florida or Texas or any of the islands that got hit a few days ago, and if/when Irma reaches northern Georgia it'll just be rain and wind. (With a high likelihood of a power outage, as my significantly-calmer-than-me housemate informs me, so I had to confess to her that power outages make me flip out pretty badly. But the fact that she's pretty calm is helping with the fact that I am, uh, a nervous wreck.)
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Let Them Eat Cake: Classic, Decadent Desserts with Vegan, Gluten-Free & Healthy Variations, by Gesine Bullock-Prado: If this cookbook were an animal, it'd be a platypus. Male platypuses have venomous spurs on their hind feet. Did you know that? But they only produce venom during breeding season, which is between June and October. Their venom isn't lethal to humans, but its effects have been described as "excruciatingly painful."

This cookbook isn't venomous, and instead of excruciatingly painful, it's actually quite delightful. The author's funny, able to admit when she's made a mistake, and is capable of pointing out the problems of palm oil in a non-confrontational way. The book, though, is like if you started out with a beaver, and then someone was like, oh, but what if I can't do buck teeth? And someone else was like, my daughter only likes animals with duckbills. And then suddenly it's laying eggs and has venomous spurs on his heels.

BECAUSE—I swear this made sense when I started out—this book takes a standard, traditional muffin, quick bread, cake, pie, tart, or cookie recipe, and THEN it gives you a vegan variation, a gluten-free variation, and a "healthier" variation, which in this case means a version with a lower glycemic index and more fiber and nutrients. So, like, grapeseed oil instead of butter, and whole wheat or spelt flour rather than white flour.

It's unwieldy. As someone who is currently cooking gluten-free, I'm fine with checking this out of the library, but I'm not going to buy it. I guess if you were experimenting with your diet, or you bake with wheat at home, but need to make things vegan for the people at work, or gluten-free for your in-laws, or more nutritious for the school bake sale—then maybe. The focus is definitely on the traditional recipe, with little boxes afterwards (or on the pages before, the book's not picky or well organized) that explain how to make it vegan, or GF, or healthier by adding egg substitutes or switching out the flours. Sometimes the vegan variation will require an entirely different recipe, which is actually easier to deal with than a paragraph of text about substitutions, so while I might try making the biscuits and scones, I'm going to photocopy the recipe and write in the GF changes myself. Using this as a book would require a lot of flipping back and forth between the main recipe and the variations. I imagine it'd be very easy to make a mistake and put in the wrong amount of something.

So the layout is kind of baroque, but the colors are nice, and almost every recipe has a photo, even if they're sometimes a few pages away from the recipe. I suspect that the photos are of the traditional recipes, though, rather than any of the variants, because I'm a suspicious person by nature, and we all know vegan or gluten-free baked goods don't always look as nice as the traditional versions. Oh, can you merge two variants together and make a vegan gluten-free whatever? Never once brought up by the author. So I'm guessing...try that at your own risk.

If you're interested in cutting down on wheat or animal products, or if you cook for several groups of people with different dietary restrictions, then maybe this is the book for you. If you're straight up vegan and/or gluten-free, I don't see the point. The recipes are pretty standard fare, except for the cake section which is full-on bananas; they involve a lot of layers, if you have the time for that. Measurements are by volume and weight (grams), and there's a helpful introduction to each recipe, but no storage advice, and the index isn't thorough enough for me.
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